Elies redefination of the existence of god and his faith in religion in the concentration camp

The suffering and death at these and other concentration camps were greater than any before endured. The Holocaust created a void in the souls of many of those who survived. Elie Wiesel was one of those people.

Elies redefination of the existence of god and his faith in religion in the concentration camp

Hardison Certified Educator This is an enormous question, and we must keep in mind that when we ask it regarding Elie in Night, we are not approaching it as character development as we would for analysis of fiction.

On the contrary, we are considering the changes a man--indeed, a boy--went through in an horrific and very real series of events.

In the beginning of his life, Elie was devoted to the Orthodox Jewish religion. This is an enormous question, and we must keep in mind that when we ask it regarding Elie in Nightwe are not approaching it as character development as we would for analysis of fiction.

He followed regular prayers and practices, then at night even studied the mystical Jewish secrets called Kabbalah.

Expert Answers

Then, as he went from camp to camp and saw atrocity after atrocity, death after death--a child with God's image in his eyes hung, with God hung beside him--he felt God die in his heart and ceased to believe in the God of the Jews, this even though he still uttered prayers of desperation to the God he no longer believed.

Elie and his father have a relationship built upon paternal and filial love, though Mr. Wiesel is not affectionately demonstrative. Elie feels devoted respect for him, and his father feels deep love and admiration for Elie. At the camps they cling to each other to stay together.

They help each other to get into the right lines and rooms so as to keep their chances of living as high as possible. Elie watches over his father who seems to continually grow older and ever weaker. Wiesel is finally broken by work and starvation, Elie gets him doctors, takes care of his dysentery the best he knows how to, and risks staying by him in their bunks.

In the end, when Elie awoke on January 28th of to find his father had been taken during the night to the crematorium, his soul could not weep for the father it had loved but felt only relief: Elie was a boy when the horrors of his night started.

Elie Wiesel's Relationship with God

He believed he lived in a world ordered by light that limited evil and harm. When he left at the end of the time of the camps, he knew he lived in a world where "absolute evil" was possible. When he left the camps, he saw in his reflection the eyes of a corpse.

The Yiddish original of Night contains a passage that illuminates the change in his view of the world: We believed in God, trusted in man, and lived with the illusion that everyone of us has been entrusted with a sacred spark from the Shekhinah's flame; that every one of us carries in his eyes and in his soul a reflection of God's image.Elie Wiesel's Relationship with God By Robert E.

Related Questions

Douglas, Jr. Sufficiency Course Sequence: The destruction of his faith in the God of his childhood was complete. No longer did his name bring cries of praise from Wiesel.

~ ~ In a concentration camp, one evening after work, a rabbi called together three of his colleagues and convoked a. Before any trauma of the holocaust occurred, Elie's relationship with God was strong and his faith was unbreakable. He was devoted to his Orthodox Jewish heritage.

He followed all prayers and practices of his religion and even studied the mystical Jewish secrets called Kabbalah during his free time at night. Initially, Eliezer’s faith is a product of his studies in Jewish mysticism, which teach him that God is everywhere in the world, that nothing exists without God, that in fact everything in the physical world is an “emanation,” or reflection, of the divine world.

The destruction of his faith in the God of his childhood was complete. No longer did his name bring cries of praise from Wiesel. God seemed unworthy in the face of His worshipers to accept their worship. However, God did not die that day. He is not dead, as the prophet Elijah told Gavriel.

God accepts Wiesel's anger, but He has not died to it. Although his faith has not yet died, on leaving his home for transport to a concentration camp, Eliezer leaves some of his religious pursuits behind, along with his childhood home, and some of his innocence.

Elies redefination of the existence of god and his faith in religion in the concentration camp

His faith is grounded in the idea that God is everywhere, all the time, that his divinity touches every aspect of his daily life. Since God is good, his studies teach him, and God is everywhere in the world, the world must therefore be good.

How does Elie Wiesel's relationship with God change throughout the memoir? | eNotes